SIT DOWN (1989)

7" RT225 -  Sit Down / Sky Is Falling

12" RTT225 - Sit Down (extended) / Goin Away / Sound Investment / Sky Is Falling

CD RTT225CD - Sit Down (extended) / Goin Away / Sound Investment / Sky Is Falling

RELEASE DATE : JUNE 1989

CHART POSITION : 77

EXPECT TO PAY : 7" £5-10, 12" £5-15, CD £10-30

VIDEO STILLS

PRESS RELEASE

French single review

Following the split from Sire, James released the number one indie album One Man Clapping with the assistance of Geoff Travis from Rough Trade. In the spring of 1989, James signed to Rough Trade and entered the studio to record Sit Down, a track written in the days of Sire which they had held back until they had escaped to a new label.

With James now a seven-piece band, the single was released in June 1989 to coincide with a short UK tour. It was released on 7", 12" and a small 3" CD single with original issues of the 7" including a free postcard. The 12" and CD formats included an eight-minute version of Sit Down ending in a reprise of the song with a sound engineer chanting Lester Piggott over the outro. B-sides to the single included Sky Is Falling, a demo that was James contribution to BOP Records legendary Manchester North of England album, Goin Away, a two-minute track that had opened up many James shows that year and Sound Investment, a meditation on the complexity of relationships.

A video directed by Ed Barton accompanied the single. Set against a white background and Tim sporting a fetching kaftan, the video features the band performing the song, Tim hugging a sheep (which apparently urinated him at one stage) and various shady-looking individuals sitting down next to Tim. The video received a Musicians Union ban for two weeks as it featured Jim impersonating a drummer, apparently taking someone else's job.

Artwork for the single was provided by Manchester's Central Station Design, responsible for most Factory Records sleeves.

The single received almost universal acclaim in the music press, but Radio 1 appeared not to pick the single up so crucial airplay was lost. The single entered the charts at number 77 and went no higher, but that was better than James had achieved before.  The song had however left an indelible mark on the James audience.